Posts Tagged ‘Roll film Size’

Kodak Roll Film + Kodak Retina 118

I think no one would doubt how much Eastman Kodak Co. (Kodak) contributed to the whole “Roll Film” development. It is so sad that this 131-year-old photographic pioneer Kodak was headed for bankruptcy recently.

Talk back to the focus of this blog article – “Roll Film”. 135 and 120 are the 2 most common formats nowadays. In fact, started from 1895, close to 40 different formats of roll films were developed. Here is a table to summarize the Kodak roll film sizes in the order they were introduced:

Number Dates Picture Size (inches)
101 1895 – Jul 1956 3.5 x 3.5
102 1895 – Sept 1933 1.5 x 2
103 1897 – Mar 1949 4 x 5
104 1897 – Mar 1949 5 x 4
105 1897 – Mar 1949 2.25 x 3.25
106 1898 – 1924 3.5 x 3.5
107 1898 – 1924 3.5 x 4.25
108 1898 – Oct 1929 4.25 x 3.25
109 1898 – 1924 4 x 5
110 1898 – Oct 1929 5 x 4
111 1898 – no date listed 6.25 x 4.75
112 1898 – 1924 7 x 5
113 1898 – no date listed 9 x  12 cm
114 1898 – no date listed 12 x 9 cm
115 1898 Mar 1949 7 x 5
116 1899 – 1984 2.5 x 4.25
117 1900 – Jul 1949 2.25 x 2.25
118 1900 – Aug 1961 3.25 x 4.25
119 1900 – Jul 1940 2.25 x 4.25
120 (220) 1901 (1965)  –   2.25 x 3.25
121 1902 – Nov 1941 1.625 x 2.5
122 1903 – Apr 1971 3.25 x 5.5
123 1904 – Mar 1949 4 x 5
124 1905 – Aug 1961 3.25 x 4.25
125 1905 – Mar 1949 3.25 x 5.5
126 1906 – Mar 1949 4.25 x 6.5
127 1912 – Jul 1995 1.625 x 2.5
128 1913 – Nov 1941 2.25 x 1.5
129 1913 – Jan 1951 3 x 2
130 1916 – Aug 1961 2.875 x 4.875
616 1931 – May 1984 2.5 x 4.25
620 1931 – Jul 1995 2.25 x 3.25
135 1934 –   24 x 36 mm
828 1935 – May 1984 28 x 40 mm
No. 35 1916 – Jan 1933 32 x 44 mm
(This special roll film for the smaller Premo camera used un-perforated 35mm film)
126 1963 – Dec 1999 28 x 28 mm
110 1972 – 13 x 17 mm
Disc 1982 – 1999 8 x 10 mm
APS 1996 – 16.7 x 30.2 mm

Source: T. Gustavson (2009) Camera. Published by: Sterling Innovation