Posts Tagged ‘film’

At 11:30 on the morning of May 29, 1953, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay reached the summit of Mt Everest, 29,028 feet above sea level, the highest spot on earth!!

The Ascent of Everest

The Ascent of Everest

It is the picture (source) of the Tenzing Norgay on the top of Mt Everest, Sir Edmund Hillary was the photographer.

If you are familiar with luxury watches (sorry I am not…), you must know it is the story behind the Rolex Explorer I – the first watch reached the highest mountain in the world, Mt Everest.
To my surprise, not so many people care or ask about which camera was used for this difficult task in 1953. What camera in 1953 was able to function well to capture this wonderful image at the highest spot on earth. The answer is here: Kodak Retina type 118 (RETINA 118). Retina 118 was produced in 1935-1936 and was the successor of Retina 117, which was introduced in my last article [Link].  Retina 118 is very similar to Retina 117,  except the rewind clutch lever was moved from film knob to the back of the top cover, and the film sprocket shaft extends across camera body. According to the record, only 9144 pieces of Retina 118 were produced.

Back of Kodak Retina type 118

Back of Kodak Retina type 118

You may question about why Sir Edmund Hillary had to use a 1935 camera to finish a 1953 Mt Everest expedition.  Obviously, Kodak was NOT the sponsor of their task. Sir Edmund bought his Retina 118 from a second hand shop and did some minor modifications, e.g. adding a small extension that was attached to the film advance lever. This allowed the operation of the film advance with heavy gloves. Now the camera was on display at an Auckland Museum.

My collection, Retina 118, is equipped with Xenar lens and Compur shutter.
It is a very compact and durable camera, so good for travel (if you don’t mind it is just a viewfinder camera, with no light metering).

Kodak Retina type 118 (1935)

Kodak Retina type 118 (1935)

Here I shared some of my photos, which were taken by this legendary camera during last Christmas…

Heidelberg Castle - Film: TMax100

Heidelberg Castle – Film: TMax100

^ This picture was taken under heavy rain in German Heidelberg Castle

Heidelberg Castle - Double Exposure - Film: TMax100

Heidelberg Castle – Double Exposure – Film: TMax100

^ Retina has no double exposure prevention system, you can  use it to create creative double exposure images

Heidelberg Christmas Market - Film: TMax100 - Model: Lu

Heidelberg Christmas Market – Film: TMax100 – Model: Lu

^ Do you like the bokeh of this  f3.5 Schneider Kreuznach Xenar Lens

Inside of Basel Munster - Film: TMax100

Inside of Basel Munster – Film: TMax100

^ Inside of the Basel Munster in Switzerland, 4s exposure time 

Details of the Camera:

Camera model – Retina type 118

Year built – 1935-1936

Lens – f3.5 Schneider Kreuznach Xenar (SN: 815333)

Shutter – Compur

Shutter speed – T, B, 1sec to 1/300 sec

Total quantity built: 9,144

Made in Germany

Advertisements

Kodak Roll Film + Kodak Retina 118

I think no one would doubt how much Eastman Kodak Co. (Kodak) contributed to the whole “Roll Film” development. It is so sad that this 131-year-old photographic pioneer Kodak was headed for bankruptcy recently.

Talk back to the focus of this blog article – “Roll Film”. 135 and 120 are the 2 most common formats nowadays. In fact, started from 1895, close to 40 different formats of roll films were developed. Here is a table to summarize the Kodak roll film sizes in the order they were introduced:

Number Dates Picture Size (inches)
101 1895 – Jul 1956 3.5 x 3.5
102 1895 – Sept 1933 1.5 x 2
103 1897 – Mar 1949 4 x 5
104 1897 – Mar 1949 5 x 4
105 1897 – Mar 1949 2.25 x 3.25
106 1898 – 1924 3.5 x 3.5
107 1898 – 1924 3.5 x 4.25
108 1898 – Oct 1929 4.25 x 3.25
109 1898 – 1924 4 x 5
110 1898 – Oct 1929 5 x 4
111 1898 – no date listed 6.25 x 4.75
112 1898 – 1924 7 x 5
113 1898 – no date listed 9 x  12 cm
114 1898 – no date listed 12 x 9 cm
115 1898 Mar 1949 7 x 5
116 1899 – 1984 2.5 x 4.25
117 1900 – Jul 1949 2.25 x 2.25
118 1900 – Aug 1961 3.25 x 4.25
119 1900 – Jul 1940 2.25 x 4.25
120 (220) 1901 (1965)  –   2.25 x 3.25
121 1902 – Nov 1941 1.625 x 2.5
122 1903 – Apr 1971 3.25 x 5.5
123 1904 – Mar 1949 4 x 5
124 1905 – Aug 1961 3.25 x 4.25
125 1905 – Mar 1949 3.25 x 5.5
126 1906 – Mar 1949 4.25 x 6.5
127 1912 – Jul 1995 1.625 x 2.5
128 1913 – Nov 1941 2.25 x 1.5
129 1913 – Jan 1951 3 x 2
130 1916 – Aug 1961 2.875 x 4.875
616 1931 – May 1984 2.5 x 4.25
620 1931 – Jul 1995 2.25 x 3.25
135 1934 –   24 x 36 mm
828 1935 – May 1984 28 x 40 mm
No. 35 1916 – Jan 1933 32 x 44 mm
(This special roll film for the smaller Premo camera used un-perforated 35mm film)
126 1963 – Dec 1999 28 x 28 mm
110 1972 – 13 x 17 mm
Disc 1982 – 1999 8 x 10 mm
APS 1996 – 16.7 x 30.2 mm

Source: T. Gustavson (2009) Camera. Published by: Sterling Innovation

Last time we talked about the last Olympus medium format camera Olympus Six RIIB (or Olympus Chrome Six RIIB) – Product of 1955.

https://wallphotography.wordpress.com/2011/10/01/olympus-chrome-six-riib-product-of-1955/

We now move forward to 1984 to see how was the impact of Olympus OM system to the whole photography and camera world!

The first OM system camera was called “M-1” in 1973, but this was changed to “OM-1” as Leica owned the “M-1” trademark for her M system cameras.

From M-1/OM-1 to OM-4 Ti, Olympus OM was a superb system of efficiency and miniaturization. Here I used OM-2SP (a very balanced model) to illustrate the OM system.

Product of 1984. The Last model of OM-2 series, the only OM-single digit system camera with A, M and P mode.

1984年出產

OM-2系列的終極版

OM 單字系統所有相機中,唯一一台據P (Program)、A (Auto光圈先決)、Manual、Spot (點測光) 的經典名機!

OM-2SP = OM-2 Spot / Program

SPOT metering function. 據有SPOT點測光功能

Program function. OM-單字System 系中唯一一台有Program功能

ISO Dial. OM-2S PROGRAM 的 ISO 轉盤

ZUIKO 50mm f/1.8 Standard Lens

Light seal is perfect! 底片倉 – 雖然已二十多年,但倉內接近完美,Light Seal海綿亦良好

Olympus OM-system ZUIKO lenses are very famous with unbeatable quality and complete range (from an 8 mm f2.8 fisheye to a 1200mm f14 tele). It is also one of the reasons made OM system successful!